clock menu more-arrow no yes mobile
A platter of sushi on a round plate.
Komo serves creative sushi in West Loop.
Kim Kovacik/Eater Chicago

Where to Eat Sushi in Chicago

Find pristine sashimi and lavish omakase menus

View as Map
Komo serves creative sushi in West Loop.
| Kim Kovacik/Eater Chicago

The Midwest isn’t known for sushi, but Chicago’s scene has exploded in recent years. The city may be far from the oceans, but chefs can now better leverage connections to source fresh products from some of the world’s best fish markets. It doesn’t hurt that Chicago is an air cargo hub, making the procurement easier, provided restaurants (and ultimately customers) are willing to pay a premium price for shipping.

For updated information on coronavirus cases, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; it may pose a risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial COVID transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

Read More
If you buy something or book a reservation from an Eater link, Vox Media may earn a commission. See our ethics policy.

Tensuke Market and Food Court

Copy Link

Store-bought sushi varies widely in quality and doesn’t tend to excite. But this Asian market in suburban Elk Grove Village punches above its weight by using fresh ingredients imported daily from overseas. The cafe in the back of the space produces made-to-order maki rolls, sashimi and nigiri sets, poke and chirashi bowls, and more. It’s all affordably priced and manages to hold its own against pieces coming out of restaurants. Customers can also purchase sushi-grade tuna and salmon to slice at home. Online ordering is available here.

Tanoshii

Copy Link

Those in the know visit Mike Ham, affectionately referred to as Sushi Mike, for his masterful ability to manipulate maki. The signature chef’s choice rolls are a popular option and can be customized to diners’ tastes. They’re packed with tuna, shrimp tempura, soft shell crab, truffle honey, and other exciting flavors. Ham has also created original dishes like “fish and chips” (spicy tuna, pico de gallo, avocado, tortilla chip) and a “tuna truffle flower” (seared tuna sashimi, chive sauce, truffle honey). Equally thrilling: The restaurant is BYOB.

Lawrence Fish Market

Copy Link

The dollar goes a long way at this popular carryout joint in Albany Park. Favored for its budget-friendly prices, Lawrence Fish Market turns out commendable maki rolls, nigiri, and sashimi. Customers can order pieces a la carte or enjoy a sushi feast with one of the party trays. It’s cash only so bring some bills.

Raisu Japanese Fine Dining

Copy Link

Oversized maki rolls take a backseat to minimalist nigiri at Raisu, where chef Simon Liew uses some of the highest-quality fish in the city. The Irving Park restaurant’s modest dining room has a six-seat sushi counter dressed with hanging lanterns, and the menu features an omakase option that starts at $75. Products, such as seasonal Hokkaido uni and botan ebi, are sourced weekly from Japan. Online ordering is available here.

Sushi Hall

Copy Link

Lincoln Park’s newish sushi haunt features the talents of Mitch Kim, the veteran chef who has spent nearly two decades serving Japanese cuisine to the neighborhood. The restaurant pairs modern design (think exposed brick walls, leather barstools, and a fish skeleton mural inspired by a tattoo on Kim’s forearm) with ever-changing menus that include vegetarian options and nods to izakaya-style dishes.

A rectangular white plate holds a row of colorful maki.
Veteran sushi chef Mitch Kim has many fans in Lincoln Park.
Barry Brechiesen/Eater Chicago

Juno Sushi

Copy Link

For chef B.K. Park, fresh fish is his palette and a sharp knife is his paint brush. With them, he composes plates of seared scallops and toro tartare, as well as an array of nigiri bites. Don’t miss the aromatic smoked sashimi either — it’s Park’s magnum opus. Online ordering for Juno is available here.

Kyōten

Copy Link

Ambitious chef Otto Phan left his lauded restaurant in Austin, Texas to come shake up Chicago’s sushi scene in 2018. His eight-seat spot provides guests with an omakase experience that showcases deft techniques and top-quality fish imported from markets in Tokyo and Fukuoka. The nigiri is composed of premium delicacies, such as Osetra caviar and fatty toro, and larger-than-standard rice grains seasoned with aged red vinegar. Kyoten’s menu is currently priced at $440-$490 per person, inclusive of service.

Sushi Suite 202

Copy Link

An intimate experience unlike any other, Sushi Suite offers pristine fish inside a 500-square-foot hotel room. The omakase restaurant — located on the second floor of Hotel Lincoln — treats guests to 17 courses over the span of 75 minutes for $125 per head. The luxurious ingredients include A5 wagyu, Hokkaido uni, and otoro tuna. On the beverage side, bartenders craft bespoke cocktails while sake is dispensed via a self-serve vending machine.

Sushi Taku

Copy Link

For the best bang-for-the-buck, it doesn’t get much better than Sushi Taku. The all-you-can-eat option — priced at $21.99 for lunch and $28.99 for dinner — lets guests order unlimited appetizers, nigiri pieces, and maki. So come hungry and go all out on salmon, spicy tuna rolls, and much more. Dine-in service is limited to 75 minutes. A second location is located in Logan Square.

One of the gold standards for sushi in Chicago has long been West Town’s Arami. Grab a seat at the bar and watch chef Joseph Fontelera prepare traditional pieces of nigiri and maki in addition to items like toro don and tuna and salmon tostadas. There are also several omakase options, including a 17-course tasting menu for $150. Online ordering is available here.

Yuzu Sushi & Robata Grill

Copy Link

Sushi becomes edible art at this neighborhood favorite in West Town. The jumbo maki rolls are stuffed full of ingredients and presented on boards that have been beautifully decorated with sauces. These vibrant drawings, which feature everything from dragons to the Chicago skyline, add a fun element to the food. Online ordering is available here.

Kai Zan

Copy Link

At this respected sushi destination, it’s best to sit back and let chefs Melvin and Carlo Vizconde do all the work by choosing the modestly-priced $85 omakase menu. The twin brothers meticulously assemble inventive creations, such as “Angry Crab” (spicy crab wrapped in tuna and topped with tempura crunch) and “Orange Rush” (seared scallop wrapped in salmon with a citrus glaze).

TAO Chicago

Copy Link

The Chicago outpost of Asian-inspired restaurant and club Tao is perhaps most notable for its nightlife action, but the food certainly shouldn’t be overlooked. The sprawling 275-seat dining room has stunning features, such as a 16-foot statue of Buddhist deity Quan Yin, and also houses a sushi bar. Guests can savor a la carte pieces of fatty tuna, shrimp, scallop, Alaskan king crab, freshwater eel, uni, and more. Or they can leave it in the hands of the experts by going the omakase route. Other menu standouts include spicy tuna tartare on crispy rice and tuna with truffle aioli, egg, and tomato on housemade Pringles chips. Online ordering is available here.

Sushi-san

Copy Link

Sushi-san’s motto is “hip hop and hand rolls,” which should give some indication of the casual vibe at Lettuce Entertain You Enterprises’ ocean-oriented sibling of Ramen-san. While chef Kaze Chan is serving a full slate of izakaya-inspired bites, from crispy tempura to grilled miso salmon, the restaurant’s sweet spot is its “San-sets” that include maki rolls and traditional nigiri and sashimi. Online ordering is available here. An intimate 10-seat space, dubbed the Omakase Room, recently debuted inside Sushi-san. It offers an 18-course menu for $250 per person.

Omakase Takeya

Copy Link

The folks behind Ramen Takeya added a seven-seat sushi restaurant to the space in 2018. Located below the noodle shop, Omakase Takeya specializes in Edomae-style sushi and kaiseki small plates by chef Hiromichi Sasaki. The 15-course, 75-minute meal is priced at $99 per person.

Momotaro

Copy Link

Boka Restaurant Group made a big splash with its foray into Japanese dining. Decorated chef Gene Kato not only carves into prime seafood, such as fatty bluefin tuna belly and striped beakfish, but also uses a robata to produce succulent pieces of lamb, chicken thighs, and more. Downstairs, a Tokyo-inspired izakaya serves more casual dishes like uni pasta and chicken katsu. In early 2023, Kato and Boka plan to introduce Itoko, an intimate new Japanese restaurant, as a part of the group’s three-part project in the former Southport Lanes in Lakeview.

Juno chef B.K. Park opened this sophisticated, minimalist dining space devoted to omaksase in 2019. Housing just 22 seats, divided between tables and a 12-seat bar, Michelin-starred Mako serves up to 23 courses of nigiri and plated Japanese dishes for $185 per person.

Chef Macku Chan (of Macku Sushi, now shuttered in Lincoln Park) has teamed up with Nils Westlind, the owner of shuttered Latin American restaurant Ronero, for this upscale Japanese venture. There’s an eight-course tasting menu that combines two traditional eating styles — kaiseki and omakase — along with a la carte nigiri and sashimi. For tuna lovers, Chan offers a Bluefin flight consisting of three different cuts topped with rich pleasures like truffle paste and uni.

Nobu Chicago

Copy Link

After several delays and much anticipation, Chicago’s first Nobu Hotel finally arrived in 2020 — and the company’s glitzy Japanese restaurant, founded by celebrity chef Nobu Matsuhisa. Diners can indulge in luxuries such as toro tartare with caviar, uni shooters, lobster and king crab tacos, and much more. There’s also an extensive selection of nigiri, sashimi, and maki rolls plus noteworthy hot dishes like the signature miso black cod. Can’t decide what to order? Try the omakase menu to sample a variety of cuts. 

Jinsei Motto

Copy Link

This pop-up-turned-permanent restaurant inside CH Distillery (the maker of Jeppson’s Malört) is one of the city’s most unusual spots, offering a 14-course omakase in a modern, industrially-influenced space. Diners can also order nigiri, sashimi, and maki a la carte.

Omakase Yume

Copy Link

Korean chef Sangtae Park helms Michelin-starred Omakase Yume, the uncluttered, blonde wood-designed omakase den in the West Loop. Expect a series of 16 seasonally-changing courses focused on Edomae-style sushi. This type of sushi originated in Edo, the old name for Tokyo, and is based on various curing and preservation techniques. Reservations are $185 per person.

312 Fish Market

Copy Link

Tucked away on the second floor of Chinese grocery emporium 88 Marketplace, this sushi bar has mostly flown under the radar since opening two years ago. Unlike typical food court vendors, 312 Fish Market gets products fresh from Japan. Former Sushi-san chef and co-partner Joe Fung delivers premium bites of fatty otoro, A5 wagyu, and uni alongside other highlights like hotate seared in truffle oil and Kobujime-style cured madai. The party platters are also a popular option as they contain an assortment of maki, nigiri, and sashimi. There’s limited counter seating but customers can take their orders to go or eat in the common dining area.

Loading comments...

Tensuke Market and Food Court

Store-bought sushi varies widely in quality and doesn’t tend to excite. But this Asian market in suburban Elk Grove Village punches above its weight by using fresh ingredients imported daily from overseas. The cafe in the back of the space produces made-to-order maki rolls, sashimi and nigiri sets, poke and chirashi bowls, and more. It’s all affordably priced and manages to hold its own against pieces coming out of restaurants. Customers can also purchase sushi-grade tuna and salmon to slice at home. Online ordering is available here.

Tanoshii

Those in the know visit Mike Ham, affectionately referred to as Sushi Mike, for his masterful ability to manipulate maki. The signature chef’s choice rolls are a popular option and can be customized to diners’ tastes. They’re packed with tuna, shrimp tempura, soft shell crab, truffle honey, and other exciting flavors. Ham has also created original dishes like “fish and chips” (spicy tuna, pico de gallo, avocado, tortilla chip) and a “tuna truffle flower” (seared tuna sashimi, chive sauce, truffle honey). Equally thrilling: The restaurant is BYOB.

Lawrence Fish Market

The dollar goes a long way at this popular carryout joint in Albany Park. Favored for its budget-friendly prices, Lawrence Fish Market turns out commendable maki rolls, nigiri, and sashimi. Customers can order pieces a la carte or enjoy a sushi feast with one of the party trays. It’s cash only so bring some bills.

Raisu Japanese Fine Dining

Oversized maki rolls take a backseat to minimalist nigiri at Raisu, where chef Simon Liew uses some of the highest-quality fish in the city. The Irving Park restaurant’s modest dining room has a six-seat sushi counter dressed with hanging lanterns, and the menu features an omakase option that starts at $75. Products, such as seasonal Hokkaido uni and botan ebi, are sourced weekly from Japan. Online ordering is available here.

Sushi Hall

Lincoln Park’s newish sushi haunt features the talents of Mitch Kim, the veteran chef who has spent nearly two decades serving Japanese cuisine to the neighborhood. The restaurant pairs modern design (think exposed brick walls, leather barstools, and a fish skeleton mural inspired by a tattoo on Kim’s forearm) with ever-changing menus that include vegetarian options and nods to izakaya-style dishes.

A rectangular white plate holds a row of colorful maki.
Veteran sushi chef Mitch Kim has many fans in Lincoln Park.
Barry Brechiesen/Eater Chicago

Juno Sushi

For chef B.K. Park, fresh fish is his palette and a sharp knife is his paint brush. With them, he composes plates of seared scallops and toro tartare, as well as an array of nigiri bites. Don’t miss the aromatic smoked sashimi either — it’s Park’s magnum opus. Online ordering for Juno is available here.

Kyōten

Ambitious chef Otto Phan left his lauded restaurant in Austin, Texas to come shake up Chicago’s sushi scene in 2018. His eight-seat spot provides guests with an omakase experience that showcases deft techniques and top-quality fish imported from markets in Tokyo and Fukuoka. The nigiri is composed of premium delicacies, such as Osetra caviar and fatty toro, and larger-than-standard rice grains seasoned with aged red vinegar. Kyoten’s menu is currently priced at $440-$490 per person, inclusive of service.

Sushi Suite 202

An intimate experience unlike any other, Sushi Suite offers pristine fish inside a 500-square-foot hotel room. The omakase restaurant — located on the second floor of Hotel Lincoln — treats guests to 17 courses over the span of 75 minutes for $125 per head. The luxurious ingredients include A5 wagyu, Hokkaido uni, and otoro tuna. On the beverage side, bartenders craft bespoke cocktails while sake is dispensed via a self-serve vending machine.

Sushi Taku

For the best bang-for-the-buck, it doesn’t get much better than Sushi Taku. The all-you-can-eat option — priced at $21.99 for lunch and $28.99 for dinner — lets guests order unlimited appetizers, nigiri pieces, and maki. So come hungry and go all out on salmon, spicy tuna rolls, and much more. Dine-in service is limited to 75 minutes. A second location is located in Logan Square.

Arami

One of the gold standards for sushi in Chicago has long been West Town’s Arami. Grab a seat at the bar and watch chef Joseph Fontelera prepare traditional pieces of nigiri and maki in addition to items like toro don and tuna and salmon tostadas. There are also several omakase options, including a 17-course tasting menu for $150. Online ordering is available here.

Yuzu Sushi & Robata Grill

Sushi becomes edible art at this neighborhood favorite in West Town. The jumbo maki rolls are stuffed full of ingredients and presented on boards that have been beautifully decorated with sauces. These vibrant drawings, which feature everything from dragons to the Chicago skyline, add a fun element to the food. Online ordering is available here.

Kai Zan

At this respected sushi destination, it’s best to sit back and let chefs Melvin and Carlo Vizconde do all the work by choosing the modestly-priced $85 omakase menu. The twin brothers meticulously assemble inventive creations, such as “Angry Crab” (spicy crab wrapped in tuna and topped with tempura crunch) and “Orange Rush” (seared scallop wrapped in salmon with a citrus glaze).

TAO Chicago

The Chicago outpost of Asian-inspired restaurant and club Tao is perhaps most notable for its nightlife action, but the food certainly shouldn’t be overlooked. The sprawling 275-seat dining room has stunning features, such as a 16-foot statue of Buddhist deity Quan Yin, and also houses a sushi bar. Guests can savor a la carte pieces of fatty tuna, shrimp, scallop, Alaskan king crab, freshwater eel, uni, and more. Or they can leave it in the hands of the experts by going the omakase route. Other menu standouts include spicy tuna tartare on crispy rice and tuna with truffle aioli, egg, and tomato on housemade Pringles chips. Online ordering is available here.

Sushi-san

Sushi-san’s motto is “hip hop and hand rolls,” which should give some indication of the casual vibe at Lettuce Entertain You Enterprises’ ocean-oriented sibling of Ramen-san. While chef Kaze Chan is serving a full slate of izakaya-inspired bites, from crispy tempura to grilled miso salmon, the restaurant’s sweet spot is its “San-sets” that include maki rolls and traditional nigiri and sashimi. Online ordering is available here. An intimate 10-seat space, dubbed the Omakase Room, recently debuted inside Sushi-san. It offers an 18-course menu for $250 per person.

Omakase Takeya

The folks behind Ramen Takeya added a seven-seat sushi restaurant to the space in 2018. Located below the noodle shop, Omakase Takeya specializes in Edomae-style sushi and kaiseki small plates by chef Hiromichi Sasaki. The 15-course, 75-minute meal is priced at $99 per person.

Related Maps

Momotaro

Boka Restaurant Group made a big splash with its foray into Japanese dining. Decorated chef Gene Kato not only carves into prime seafood, such as fatty bluefin tuna belly and striped beakfish, but also uses a robata to produce succulent pieces of lamb, chicken thighs, and more. Downstairs, a Tokyo-inspired izakaya serves more casual dishes like uni pasta and chicken katsu. In early 2023, Kato and Boka plan to introduce Itoko, an intimate new Japanese restaurant, as a part of the group’s three-part project in the former Southport Lanes in Lakeview.

Mako

Juno chef B.K. Park opened this sophisticated, minimalist dining space devoted to omaksase in 2019. Housing just 22 seats, divided between tables and a 12-seat bar, Michelin-starred Mako serves up to 23 courses of nigiri and plated Japanese dishes for $185 per person.

Komo

Chef Macku Chan (of Macku Sushi, now shuttered in Lincoln Park) has teamed up with Nils Westlind, the owner of shuttered Latin American restaurant Ronero, for this upscale Japanese venture. There’s an eight-course tasting menu that combines two traditional eating styles — kaiseki and omakase — along with a la carte nigiri and sashimi. For tuna lovers, Chan offers a Bluefin flight consisting of three different cuts topped with rich pleasures like truffle paste and uni.

Nobu Chicago

After several delays and much anticipation, Chicago’s first Nobu Hotel finally arrived in 2020 — and the company’s glitzy Japanese restaurant, founded by celebrity chef Nobu Matsuhisa. Diners can indulge in luxuries such as toro tartare with caviar, uni shooters, lobster and king crab tacos, and much more. There’s also an extensive selection of nigiri, sashimi, and maki rolls plus noteworthy hot dishes like the signature miso black cod. Can’t decide what to order? Try the omakase menu to sample a variety of cuts. 

Jinsei Motto

This pop-up-turned-permanent restaurant inside CH Distillery (the maker of Jeppson’s Malört) is one of the city’s most unusual spots, offering a 14-course omakase in a modern, industrially-influenced space. Diners can also order nigiri, sashimi, and maki a la carte.

Omakase Yume

Korean chef Sangtae Park helms Michelin-starred Omakase Yume, the uncluttered, blonde wood-designed omakase den in the West Loop. Expect a series of 16 seasonally-changing courses focused on Edomae-style sushi. This type of sushi originated in Edo, the old name for Tokyo, and is based on various curing and preservation techniques. Reservations are $185 per person.

312 Fish Market

Tucked away on the second floor of Chinese grocery emporium 88 Marketplace, this sushi bar has mostly flown under the radar since opening two years ago. Unlike typical food court vendors, 312 Fish Market gets products fresh from Japan. Former Sushi-san chef and co-partner Joe Fung delivers premium bites of fatty otoro, A5 wagyu, and uni alongside other highlights like hotate seared in truffle oil and Kobujime-style cured madai. The party platters are also a popular option as they contain an assortment of maki, nigiri, and sashimi. There’s limited counter seating but customers can take their orders to go or eat in the common dining area.

Related Maps