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A person cooking meat on a grill that’s surrounded with more meats and side dishes.
Satisfy barbecue cravings with all-you-can-eat meat and seafood at Ryuu Asian BBQ.
Ryuu Asian BBQ

Where to Enjoy Sizzling Asian Barbecue in Chicago

Master the art of grilling at these hotspots

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Satisfy barbecue cravings with all-you-can-eat meat and seafood at Ryuu Asian BBQ.
| Ryuu Asian BBQ

Like most good things in life, food just tastes better when one has a hand in making it with a roaring fire. Enter Asian barbecue. This popular type of cuisine usually involves diners cooking their own meats and seafood on tabletop grills. The list below highlights the best spots to feast on galbi, bulgogi, wagyu beef, Beijing roast duck, and much more. Some even offer an all-you-can-eat option so bring an appetite.

As of August 20, the city has mandated that everyone wear facial coverings while indoors. For updated information on coronavirus cases, please visit the city of Chicago’s COVID-19 dashboard. Health experts consider dining out to be a high-risk activity for the unvaccinated; the latest data about the delta variant indicates that it may pose a low-to-moderate risk for the vaccinated, especially in areas with substantial transmission. The latest CDC guidance is here; find a COVID-19 vaccination site here.

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Pro Samgyupsal

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Pork is the star of the show at this Korean spot up in Northbrook. Samgyeopsal, or grilled pork belly, is the signature dish and available in several styles. Roll up those sleeves, order a round of beer, and get ready to enjoy succulent and fatty slices of meats that are cooked at the table.

Pork cooking on a grill, surrounded by banchan.
Take a trip to Northbrook for mouthwatering pork belly.
Jeffy Mai/Eater Chicago

Mr. Kimchi

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Out in Mount Prospect, Mr Kimchi is a popular destination for unlimited quantities of Korean barbecue. Diners can order up to 29 different things to try, ranging from brisket and pork ribs to squid and baby octopus. The all-you-can-eat menu is priced at $19.95 for lunch (9 items) and $29.95 (23 items) or $34.95 (29 items) for dinner.

One of the city’s finest barbecue restaurants resides in a nondescript strip mall on the far North Side. What sets Gogi apart from the competition is the attentive service and a focus on quality meats. Servers will happily grill galbi, pork belly, brisket, and more over charcoal for novices.

Woo Chon

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It’s hard to go wrong with ordering copious amounts of beef and pork but at Woo Chon, the Korean pancakes, soups, noodles, and rice cakes are all great complements to a carnivorous feast.

Short ribs cooking on a grill.
Woo Chon is a Korean favorite in West Rogers Park.
Woo Chon [Official Photo]

San Soo Gab San

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Synonymous with Korean barbecue in Chicago, San Soo Gab San is where many locals like to go for galbi, bulgogi, and other grilled meats. The banchan selection is also impressive and adds a multitude of flavors to the meal. Another bonus: The restaurant keeps late hours. A second location is in Morton Grove.

Unbeknownst to some, this unassuming Lincoln Square spot actually serves the city’s most irresistible Korean pub fare. The small, dark dive is busy late at night, when guests stumble in for sustenance. The flattop grill built into the bar creates sizzling skewers and the signature buldak, also known as fire chicken. The must-try dish features chicken marinated in spices and then sublimely charred over open fire. An optional, but recommended, blanket of melted cheese can be added to it.

Sun Wah BBQ

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The sight of hanging barbecued meats beckons folks into this long-standing Chinese institution that’s been around since 1986. Enjoy specialties like soy sauce chicken, roast pork, and char siu, as well as Hong Kong-style dishes. The highlight, though, is the Beijing roast duck dinner. The three-course meal is carved tableside and should be pre-ordered when making a reservation as it tends to sell out.

Chicago Kalbi

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It’s Korean barbecue with a slight twist at Chicago Kalbi. The menu touts traditional cuts such as galbi and bulgogi, but the Japanese-style marinades give them unique flavor profiles. There’s also wagyu beef imported from overseas. Adventurous eaters have offal options like beef tongue, liver, and heart, while baseball fans can gawk at the memorabilia from Japanese players that line the walls.

A platter of sliced beef.
Chicago Kalbi offers coveted wagyu beef.
Chicago Kalbi [Official Photo]

Cho Sun Ok

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Korean food enthusiasts know and love this no-frills Lincoln Square restaurant, where there’s usually a line waiting to get in. Having a Korean-speaking person helps the process go smoothly but for the uninitiated, order the house specialty, chadol-gui. The thin slices of beef brisket are cooked tableside in a stone pan and the leftover banchan are used to make crispy kimchi fried rice. The cherry on top: It’s BYOB.

Ryuu Asian BBQ

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Japanese, Korean, and Thai flavors come together at this sleek Logan Square restaurant. Each table is equipped with a Japanese-style smokeless grill that’s used to cook things like filet mignon, marinated shrimp, and chicken satay. They’re paired with various dipping sauces. There’s also an all-you-can-eat option for $29 per person.

A person cooking meat on a grill that’s surrounded with banchan.
The AYCE menu is popular at Ryuu Asian BBQ.
Ryuu Asian BBQ [Official Photo]

Izakaya Mita

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Head to this this beloved Japanese pub in Bucktown for terrific Asian comfort food. Mother and son Helen and Brian Mita use binchotan, a high quality charcoal made from oak, on the grill to produce perfectly seared and juicy kushiyaki. Nibble on bites of white and dark chicken meat, chicken skins, duck, pork belly, beef tongue, salmon, shishito peppers, and more. Then wash it down with a bottle from the extensive sake and shochu collection.

Iron Age Korean Steakhouse

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Want the best bang for the buck? Then look no further than Iron Age Korean Steakhouse. It’s $25 per person for all-you-can-eat meats, seafood, and veggies, all of which are cooked by diners on tabletop grills. Options include marinated chicken, pork belly, top blade steak, bulgogi, shrimp, and more, plus several side dishes. There’s a second location in Glenview.

A piece of meat cooking on a grill, surrounded by banchan.
Iron Age is an affordable option for endless Korean barbecue.
Iron Age Korean Steakhouse [Official Photo]

Gyu-Kaku

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A Japanese barbecue chain with four locations in Chicagoland, Gyu-Kaku offers both massive family-style feasts and a la carte items. Build a meal full of grilled beef, poultry, pork, seafood, and veggies. There’s also an all-you-can-eat menu available Mondays through Thursdays. The other outposts are in West Loop, Lakeview, and Naperville. Order online here.

A plate of raw meat.
This established Japanese chain offers lots of delectable items to throw on the grill.
Gyu-Kaku [Official Photo]

Perilla Korean American Fare

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There’s a lot to like at this modern Korean American restaurant in River West. Grilled meats are an obvious highlight, featuring choices like Duroc pork belly, galbi, and cuts of American and Japanese wagyu beef. But the rest of the shareable plates shouldn’t be overlooked. Fire chicken, Korean fried chicken, and kimchi pancakes are all standouts worth ordering. Order carryout here or delivery here.

Momotaro

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Prior to becoming the executive chef of Momotaro, Gene Kato developed a reputation for his expert work with the robata grill at Sumi Robata Bar. He brought those skills over to Boka Restaurant Group’s modern Japanese goliath in 2018 and continues to use hot coals to produce impressive skewers of chicken thighs, bone-in lamb chops, shishito peppers, shiitake mushrooms, and more. For guests looking to really indulge, try the melt-in-the-mouth wagyu beef. Online ordering is available here.

Daebak Korean BBQ

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Variety is the spice of life, which is why Chinatown Square is also home to K-pop and grilled meats. Industrial-chic Daebak satisfies carnivores with a hearty selection of beef and pork cuts. Sear hunks of Prime rib eye or pork jowl to go along with hot stone bibimbap and soups, all while jamming out to music videos playing on televisions. Online ordering is available here.

This new Asian and American steakhouse located inside Marketplace 88 delivers an upscale experience filled with luxuries. Start with appetizers like wagyu caviar tartare, lobster salad, and oysters topped with uni and caviar before moving onto the main course: The meats. There are smokeless charcoal grills built into each table to let guests cook dry-aged steaks, A5 wagyu, and specials such as pork secreto and jumbo Australian lobster.

BBQ King House

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It doesn’t get much better for a budget-friendly assortment of barbecued meats than this Chinatown stalwart. Feast on roasted ducks, soy sauce chickens, roasted pork belly, char siu, and more without breaking the bank. The popular Beijing duck dinner, priced at $39.88, feeds three-to-four people and includes four courses.

Jiang Niu BBQ House

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All-you-can-eat offerings are the major appeal of this new Asian fusion spot in Chinatown. The flavors are influenced by both Korean barbecue and the Dongbei region of China and guests have many items to choose from, such as marinated beef, spicy pork belly, garlic pork chops, tilapia, mushrooms, and much more. It’s priced at $34.99 per person for dinner and $27.99 during lunch hours. A la carte dishes are available as well. Online orders can be placed here.

A variety of meats and dishes spread across two tables.
Diners can devour as much barbecue as they want at Jiang Niu BBQ House.
Jiang Niu BBQ House [Official Photo]

Do Eat

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A relative newcomer to the Korean barbecue scene, Do Eat has been a welcome addition to the South Side. Guests can get their fix of lamb chops, galbi, and rib eye, either grilled tableside or prepared by the kitchen. Rounding out the menu are traditional items such as tofu stew, seafood pancake, and tteokbokki. Order online here.

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Pro Samgyupsal

Pork cooking on a grill, surrounded by banchan.
Take a trip to Northbrook for mouthwatering pork belly.
Jeffy Mai/Eater Chicago

Pork is the star of the show at this Korean spot up in Northbrook. Samgyeopsal, or grilled pork belly, is the signature dish and available in several styles. Roll up those sleeves, order a round of beer, and get ready to enjoy succulent and fatty slices of meats that are cooked at the table.

Pork cooking on a grill, surrounded by banchan.
Take a trip to Northbrook for mouthwatering pork belly.
Jeffy Mai/Eater Chicago

Mr. Kimchi

Out in Mount Prospect, Mr Kimchi is a popular destination for unlimited quantities of Korean barbecue. Diners can order up to 29 different things to try, ranging from brisket and pork ribs to squid and baby octopus. The all-you-can-eat menu is priced at $19.95 for lunch (9 items) and $29.95 (23 items) or $34.95 (29 items) for dinner.

Gogi

One of the city’s finest barbecue restaurants resides in a nondescript strip mall on the far North Side. What sets Gogi apart from the competition is the attentive service and a focus on quality meats. Servers will happily grill galbi, pork belly, brisket, and more over charcoal for novices.

Woo Chon

Short ribs cooking on a grill.
Woo Chon is a Korean favorite in West Rogers Park.
Woo Chon [Official Photo]

It’s hard to go wrong with ordering copious amounts of beef and pork but at Woo Chon, the Korean pancakes, soups, noodles, and rice cakes are all great complements to a carnivorous feast.

Short ribs cooking on a grill.
Woo Chon is a Korean favorite in West Rogers Park.
Woo Chon [Official Photo]

San Soo Gab San

Synonymous with Korean barbecue in Chicago, San Soo Gab San is where many locals like to go for galbi, bulgogi, and other grilled meats. The banchan selection is also impressive and adds a multitude of flavors to the meal. Another bonus: The restaurant keeps late hours. A second location is in Morton Grove.

Dancen

Unbeknownst to some, this unassuming Lincoln Square spot actually serves the city’s most irresistible Korean pub fare. The small, dark dive is busy late at night, when guests stumble in for sustenance. The flattop grill built into the bar creates sizzling skewers and the signature buldak, also known as fire chicken. The must-try dish features chicken marinated in spices and then sublimely charred over open fire. An optional, but recommended, blanket of melted cheese can be added to it.

Sun Wah BBQ

The sight of hanging barbecued meats beckons folks into this long-standing Chinese institution that’s been around since 1986. Enjoy specialties like soy sauce chicken, roast pork, and char siu, as well as Hong Kong-style dishes. The highlight, though, is the Beijing roast duck dinner. The three-course meal is carved tableside and should be pre-ordered when making a reservation as it tends to sell out.

Chicago Kalbi

A platter of sliced beef.
Chicago Kalbi offers coveted wagyu beef.
Chicago Kalbi [Official Photo]

It’s Korean barbecue with a slight twist at Chicago Kalbi. The menu touts traditional cuts such as galbi and bulgogi, but the Japanese-style marinades give them unique flavor profiles. There’s also wagyu beef imported from overseas. Adventurous eaters have offal options like beef tongue, liver, and heart, while baseball fans can gawk at the memorabilia from Japanese players that line the walls.

A platter of sliced beef.
Chicago Kalbi offers coveted wagyu beef.
Chicago Kalbi [Official Photo]

Cho Sun Ok

Korean food enthusiasts know and love this no-frills Lincoln Square restaurant, where there’s usually a line waiting to get in. Having a Korean-speaking person helps the process go smoothly but for the uninitiated, order the house specialty, chadol-gui. The thin slices of beef brisket are cooked tableside in a stone pan and the leftover banchan are used to make crispy kimchi fried rice. The cherry on top: It’s BYOB.

Ryuu Asian BBQ

A person cooking meat on a grill that’s surrounded with banchan.
The AYCE menu is popular at Ryuu Asian BBQ.
Ryuu Asian BBQ [Official Photo]

Japanese, Korean, and Thai flavors come together at this sleek Logan Square restaurant. Each table is equipped with a Japanese-style smokeless grill that’s used to cook things like filet mignon, marinated shrimp, and chicken satay. They’re paired with various dipping sauces. There’s also an all-you-can-eat option for $29 per person.

A person cooking meat on a grill that’s surrounded with banchan.
The AYCE menu is popular at Ryuu Asian BBQ.
Ryuu Asian BBQ [Official Photo]

Izakaya Mita

Head to this this beloved Japanese pub in Bucktown for terrific Asian comfort food. Mother and son Helen and Brian Mita use binchotan, a high quality charcoal made from oak, on the grill to produce perfectly seared and juicy kushiyaki. Nibble on bites of white and dark chicken meat, chicken skins, duck, pork belly, beef tongue, salmon, shishito peppers, and more. Then wash it down with a bottle from the extensive sake and shochu collection.

Iron Age Korean Steakhouse

A piece of meat cooking on a grill, surrounded by banchan.
Iron Age is an affordable option for endless Korean barbecue.
Iron Age Korean Steakhouse [Official Photo]

Want the best bang for the buck? Then look no further than Iron Age Korean Steakhouse. It’s $25 per person for all-you-can-eat meats, seafood, and veggies, all of which are cooked by diners on tabletop grills. Options include marinated chicken, pork belly, top blade steak, bulgogi, shrimp, and more, plus several side dishes. There’s a second location in Glenview.

A piece of meat cooking on a grill, surrounded by banchan.
Iron Age is an affordable option for endless Korean barbecue.
Iron Age Korean Steakhouse [Official Photo]

Gyu-Kaku

A plate of raw meat.
This established Japanese chain offers lots of delectable items to throw on the grill.
Gyu-Kaku [Official Photo]

A Japanese barbecue chain with four locations in Chicagoland, Gyu-Kaku offers both massive family-style feasts and a la carte items. Build a meal full of grilled beef, poultry, pork, seafood, and veggies. There’s also an all-you-can-eat menu available Mondays through Thursdays. The other outposts are in West Loop, Lakeview, and Naperville. Order online here.

A plate of raw meat.
This established Japanese chain offers lots of delectable items to throw on the grill.
Gyu-Kaku [Official Photo]

Perilla Korean American Fare

There’s a lot to like at this modern Korean American restaurant in River West. Grilled meats are an obvious highlight, featuring choices like Duroc pork belly, galbi, and cuts of American and Japanese wagyu beef. But the rest of the shareable plates shouldn’t be overlooked. Fire chicken, Korean fried chicken, and kimchi pancakes are all standouts worth ordering. Order carryout here or delivery here.

Momotaro

Prior to becoming the executive chef of Momotaro, Gene Kato developed a reputation for his expert work with the robata grill at Sumi Robata Bar. He brought those skills over to Boka Restaurant Group’s modern Japanese goliath in 2018 and continues to use hot coals to produce impressive skewers of chicken thighs, bone-in lamb chops, shishito peppers, shiitake mushrooms, and more. For guests looking to really indulge, try the melt-in-the-mouth wagyu beef. Online ordering is available here.

Related Maps

Daebak Korean BBQ

Variety is the spice of life, which is why Chinatown Square is also home to K-pop and grilled meats. Industrial-chic Daebak satisfies carnivores with a hearty selection of beef and pork cuts. Sear hunks of Prime rib eye or pork jowl to go along with hot stone bibimbap and soups, all while jamming out to music videos playing on televisions. Online ordering is available here.

Holu

This new Asian and American steakhouse located inside Marketplace 88 delivers an upscale experience filled with luxuries. Start with appetizers like wagyu caviar tartare, lobster salad, and oysters topped with uni and caviar before moving onto the main course: The meats. There are smokeless charcoal grills built into each table to let guests cook dry-aged steaks, A5 wagyu, and specials such as pork secreto and jumbo Australian lobster.

BBQ King House

It doesn’t get much better for a budget-friendly assortment of barbecued meats than this Chinatown stalwart. Feast on roasted ducks, soy sauce chickens, roasted pork belly, char siu, and more without breaking the bank. The popular Beijing duck dinner, priced at $39.88, feeds three-to-four people and includes four courses.

Jiang Niu BBQ House

A variety of meats and dishes spread across two tables.
Diners can devour as much barbecue as they want at Jiang Niu BBQ House.
Jiang Niu BBQ House [Official Photo]

All-you-can-eat offerings are the major appeal of this new Asian fusion spot in Chinatown. The flavors are influenced by both Korean barbecue and the Dongbei region of China and guests have many items to choose from, such as marinated beef, spicy pork belly, garlic pork chops, tilapia, mushrooms, and much more. It’s priced at $34.99 per person for dinner and $27.99 during lunch hours. A la carte dishes are available as well. Online orders can be placed here.

A variety of meats and dishes spread across two tables.
Diners can devour as much barbecue as they want at Jiang Niu BBQ House.
Jiang Niu BBQ House [Official Photo]

Do Eat

A relative newcomer to the Korean barbecue scene, Do Eat has been a welcome addition to the South Side. Guests can get their fix of lamb chops, galbi, and rib eye, either grilled tableside or prepared by the kitchen. Rounding out the menu are traditional items such as tofu stew, seafood pancake, and tteokbokki. Order online here.

Related Maps