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From ribeyes to NY strips, Chicago has plenty of delicious steaks.
Boefhaus

Chicago’s Essential Steakhouses

Welcome to the jungle, now you’re gonna dine

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From ribeyes to NY strips, Chicago has plenty of delicious steaks.
| Boefhaus

Even though Chicago chefs have worked wonders to change what the world thinks of its culinary offerings, Chicago’s steakhouses still thrive. Seated in the middle of the country as a city of commerce, business folks still turn to steakhouses for power lunches and conduct meetings.

That doesn’t mean steakhouses still need to feel like they’re something out of an ‘80s movie about Wall Street. Service has improved. Beef is better sourced: the best butchers will say Americans need to eat less meat. One way to eat less meat is to find thoughtfully sourced steaks that aren’t pumped with hormones. It’s certainly more satisfying than the hockey pucks served at the neighborhood dive.

Modern steakhouses offer better service, gorgeous views, and more options than ever before — wedge salads are iconic, but salad lovers deserve better than iceberg and ranch. Dive into Eater Chicago’s best steakhouses around.

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Artango Bar & Steakhouse

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Chicago’s gateway to Argentinian cuisine can be found at this lively Lincoln Square restaurant. Artango channels the spirit of Buenos Aires thanks to a 1920s theme, live music, tango dancing, and an array of grilled meats. The grass-fed beef range from short ribs to ojo de bife (heart of rib eye), and they’re served with chimichurri or oyster-malbec sauce. Steak flights are also an option for diners looking to share or sample multiple cuts.

A platter of sliced steak.
Take a culinary journey to South America at Artango.
Artango [Official Photo]

Maple & Ash

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This Gold Coast steakhouse was the subject of courthouse drama with a drama-filled ownership split, and now investors are suing current ownership. Diners have been shielded from court proceedings as they enter through the attached ground-floor restaurant, Eight Bar and Patio, before arriving upstairs to a stylish and boisterous dining room. It’s home to a standout selection of caviar, fire-roasted seafood towers, dry-aged steaks, and fine wines. To go all out, opt for the set menu that puts the decision-making in the hands of the kitchen.

Gibsons Bar & Steakhouse

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Gibsons is the quintessential place to get mammoth cuts, such as 48-ounce porterhouses and 32-ounce tomahawk chops, or grass-fed Australian beef. Gibsons has a few locations, including Gibsons Italia, a more modern representation with gorgeous views of the Chicago River. Don’t forget to order a slab of chocolate cake.

Boeufhaus

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An unassuming French- and German-inspired restaurant, Boeufhaus has been a hit with beef lovers since opening in 2015. It’s a tidy menu; diners won’t find huge pieces of meat, but tasty cuts of dry-aged New York stip and ribeye. For lunch, the kitchen also makes terrific deli sandwiches and dishes like short rib beignets. The wine list is notable, as is the service.

GT Prime Steakhouse

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Chef Giuseppe Tentori wanted to redefine what a steakhouse should be when it opened GT Prime in River North. The pandemic altered plans, but there’s still a great selection of Aussie wagyu, plus a dash of A5 wagyu from Japan. There’s a package called the Carnivore that offers the best GT Prime for $300.

Asador Bastian

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From the husband-and-wife team of Doug Psaltis and Hsing Chen, the duo who gave Logan Square Andros Taverna, Asador Bastian is a Spanish-inspired restaurant inside a historic building in River North. The menu, beyond the beef, is impressive. The steak itself are special, with the fat akin to the smoky goodness of an al pastor taco. Folks can throw serious celebrations here with ace desserts and great wine.

Chicago Chop House

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Visit Chicago Chop House for a side of history with every meal. The restaurant is located inside a Victorian brownstone building that was recently renovated, and old-time photos of the city line the dining room walls. The menu offers both wet-aged and dry-aged Angus beef, as well as a prime rib on Saturdays.

A table full of steaks and sides.
Venerable Chicago Chop House was recently renovated.
Chicago Chop House [Official Photo]

Steak 48

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The family who founded Mastro’s introduced another steakhouse to Chicago in 2017. Straddling the line between modern and traditional, Steak 48’s two floors are equipped with an open kitchen, fireplaces, multiple bars, and an outdoor patio. The steaks are wet-aged for 28 days and can be topped with accompaniments such as burrata, foie gras, or black truffle-sauteed lobster.

Steak topped with lobster.
Steak 48’s beef can be enhanced with toppings.
Steak 48 [Official Photo]

Gene & Georgetti

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Chicago’s oldest steakhouse opened in 1941. The steaks are simply wet-aged before being thrown in the broiler. Wait staff still dresses in white coats, which gives the space a special feel.

A ribeye beef steak with a sprig of rosemary on top. Gene & Georgetti

RPM Steak

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RPM, from Bill and Giuliana Rancic and Lettuce Entertain You Enterprises, is one of the sexiest spaces in town, dimly lit and club-like. RPM prides itself on finding unique cuts of meat, sometimes it could be a prized selection of wagyu, and other times it could be well-marbled and dry-aged meat. RPM mixes a serious steakhouse with a scenester vibe, creating a unique experience.

Bavette's Bar & Boeuf

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Hogsalt Hospitality’s sultry French-inspired spot is at the forefront of a new wave of steakhouses in Chicago. There are traditional entrees, such as roasted chicken and lamb chops, along with contemporary choices like fried chicken and a French dip sandwich. The beef is predictably top-notch, especially the 42-day dry-aged ribeye that’s complemented by béarnaise sauce.

A bone-in rib eye with a cup of Béarnaise on the side.
Bavette’s embraces French flair.
Bavette’s [Official Photo]

Fioretta

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This Fulton Market steakhouse, from the DineAmic Hospitality is over the top and one of the neighborhood’s prettiest restaurants, which is something in one of the competitive areas in the city. DineAmic has a reputation for knowing how to throw a loud party, and they’ve taken those elements and refined them into an Italian steakhouse, finishing the beef with a butter bath. Most of the beef is Linz Heritage Black Angus.

Swift & Sons

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Boka Restaurant Group’s exquisite meat palace wows diners with compelling versions of Caesar salad, steak tartare, and other steakhouse staples. For dessert, a chocolate trolley filled with cakes, cookies, candies, and more is wheeled around the dining room. There’s a sibling location across from Wrigley Field with a scaled-back menu.

A platter of sliced steak.
Steaks like this and beef Wellington are Swift & Sons’ signature items.
Swift & Sons [Official Photo]

BLVD Steakhouse

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BLVD pivoted during the pandemic and now hands its reins to chef Joe Flamm who moves over from Rose Mary to give this West Loop space some pop. The steaks are from several local farms and can be boosted with toppings like chimichurri, blue cheese, or béarnaise. The space remains luxe and feels very vintage Hollywood. 

Bazaar Meat by José Andrés

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José Andrés and Gibsons partnered on this beefy spot by the river above Bar Mar. It offers suckling pig, sweetbreads, and blood sausage, but the standouts are the steaks: wagyu, angus, “vaca viejo” (from older working cattle, said to have a more pronounced flavor), chateaubriand, bone-in, skirt steak, and much, much more.

A long green print-upholstered banquette encircles a table beneath a geometric chandelier in the foreground; in the background, more tables and floor-to-ceiling windows.
The dining room at Bazaar Meat by José Andrés.
Garrett Sweet/Eater Chicago

El Che Steakhouse & Bar

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Chef John Manion pays tribute to asado, a traditional South American barbecue, at his West Loop restaurant. The dining room is set up to give diners a first-hand look at Argentinian-style cuts cooking over open flames on a custom-built hearth. Order the parrillada platter for a variety of different meats, including grilled beef short ribs, sweetbreads, bone marrow, morcilla, chorizo, bife angosto, and more.

Bonyeon

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In America, “omakase” is mostly reserved for sushi chefs. But perception is changing, and the owners of Omakase Yume, a fantastic sushi restaurant in its own right, are showing off different elements of Japanese and Korean cooking. Chef Sangtae Park has unveiled Bonyeon, a 12-seat counter with seven courses dedicated to showcasing beef in its purest forms. Well-known cuts will accompany less-appreciated ones, as Park gives diners a dining experience seldom seen in Chicago.

A chef presents a small plate of cooked beef. Jeff Marini/Bonyeon

Kindling | Downtown Cookout & Cocktails

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Perhaps it’s not giving Kindling, the ground-floor restaurant inside the Willis Tower, not enough credit by calling it a steakhouse. Chef Jonathon Sawyer won a James Beard Award for his work in Cleveland, and he’s made a mark by teaming up with Fifty/50 Restaurant Group with a decadent menu of fire-grilled items. Inspired by famed chef Francis Mallmann, the team takes pride in live-fire cooking, and the result is some of the tastiest beef in Chicago with a hint of South American influence. Seriously, everything — even the wagyu Italian beef — is kissed with a little smoke. And that leads to deliciousness. 

Chris Peters/Eater Chicago

Chicago Firehouse Restaurant

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Located inside a building that was once a Chicago Fire Department firehouse, this South Loop establishment is steeped in history. In 2017, ownership rebuilt and restored the space after a devastating fire forced it to close. The menu boasts highlights like lobster bisque, prime steaks, and Irish coffee cheesecake.

The item at the very top of the menu at Holu is “Meat Paradise,” and the steakhouse in the 88 Marketplace in Pilsen delivers: there are USDA Prime cuts, Australian and American wagyu, and Japanese Kobe, plus non-beefy seasonal specials like Iberico ham, live eel, and lobster. Order by the ounce to try out every cut, and then cook the meat to your desired temperature on a tabletop grill.

Artango Bar & Steakhouse

Chicago’s gateway to Argentinian cuisine can be found at this lively Lincoln Square restaurant. Artango channels the spirit of Buenos Aires thanks to a 1920s theme, live music, tango dancing, and an array of grilled meats. The grass-fed beef range from short ribs to ojo de bife (heart of rib eye), and they’re served with chimichurri or oyster-malbec sauce. Steak flights are also an option for diners looking to share or sample multiple cuts.

A platter of sliced steak.
Take a culinary journey to South America at Artango.
Artango [Official Photo]

Maple & Ash

This Gold Coast steakhouse was the subject of courthouse drama with a drama-filled ownership split, and now investors are suing current ownership. Diners have been shielded from court proceedings as they enter through the attached ground-floor restaurant, Eight Bar and Patio, before arriving upstairs to a stylish and boisterous dining room. It’s home to a standout selection of caviar, fire-roasted seafood towers, dry-aged steaks, and fine wines. To go all out, opt for the set menu that puts the decision-making in the hands of the kitchen.

Gibsons Bar & Steakhouse

Gibsons is the quintessential place to get mammoth cuts, such as 48-ounce porterhouses and 32-ounce tomahawk chops, or grass-fed Australian beef. Gibsons has a few locations, including Gibsons Italia, a more modern representation with gorgeous views of the Chicago River. Don’t forget to order a slab of chocolate cake.

Boeufhaus

An unassuming French- and German-inspired restaurant, Boeufhaus has been a hit with beef lovers since opening in 2015. It’s a tidy menu; diners won’t find huge pieces of meat, but tasty cuts of dry-aged New York stip and ribeye. For lunch, the kitchen also makes terrific deli sandwiches and dishes like short rib beignets. The wine list is notable, as is the service.

GT Prime Steakhouse

Chef Giuseppe Tentori wanted to redefine what a steakhouse should be when it opened GT Prime in River North. The pandemic altered plans, but there’s still a great selection of Aussie wagyu, plus a dash of A5 wagyu from Japan. There’s a package called the Carnivore that offers the best GT Prime for $300.

Asador Bastian

From the husband-and-wife team of Doug Psaltis and Hsing Chen, the duo who gave Logan Square Andros Taverna, Asador Bastian is a Spanish-inspired restaurant inside a historic building in River North. The menu, beyond the beef, is impressive. The steak itself are special, with the fat akin to the smoky goodness of an al pastor taco. Folks can throw serious celebrations here with ace desserts and great wine.

Chicago Chop House

Visit Chicago Chop House for a side of history with every meal. The restaurant is located inside a Victorian brownstone building that was recently renovated, and old-time photos of the city line the dining room walls. The menu offers both wet-aged and dry-aged Angus beef, as well as a prime rib on Saturdays.

A table full of steaks and sides.
Venerable Chicago Chop House was recently renovated.
Chicago Chop House [Official Photo]

Steak 48

The family who founded Mastro’s introduced another steakhouse to Chicago in 2017. Straddling the line between modern and traditional, Steak 48’s two floors are equipped with an open kitchen, fireplaces, multiple bars, and an outdoor patio. The steaks are wet-aged for 28 days and can be topped with accompaniments such as burrata, foie gras, or black truffle-sauteed lobster.

Steak topped with lobster.
Steak 48’s beef can be enhanced with toppings.
Steak 48 [Official Photo]

Gene & Georgetti

Chicago’s oldest steakhouse opened in 1941. The steaks are simply wet-aged before being thrown in the broiler. Wait staff still dresses in white coats, which gives the space a special feel.

A ribeye beef steak with a sprig of rosemary on top. Gene & Georgetti

RPM Steak

RPM, from Bill and Giuliana Rancic and Lettuce Entertain You Enterprises, is one of the sexiest spaces in town, dimly lit and club-like. RPM prides itself on finding unique cuts of meat, sometimes it could be a prized selection of wagyu, and other times it could be well-marbled and dry-aged meat. RPM mixes a serious steakhouse with a scenester vibe, creating a unique experience.

Bavette's Bar & Boeuf

Hogsalt Hospitality’s sultry French-inspired spot is at the forefront of a new wave of steakhouses in Chicago. There are traditional entrees, such as roasted chicken and lamb chops, along with contemporary choices like fried chicken and a French dip sandwich. The beef is predictably top-notch, especially the 42-day dry-aged ribeye that’s complemented by béarnaise sauce.

A bone-in rib eye with a cup of Béarnaise on the side.
Bavette’s embraces French flair.
Bavette’s [Official Photo]

Fioretta

This Fulton Market steakhouse, from the DineAmic Hospitality is over the top and one of the neighborhood’s prettiest restaurants, which is something in one of the competitive areas in the city. DineAmic has a reputation for knowing how to throw a loud party, and they’ve taken those elements and refined them into an Italian steakhouse, finishing the beef with a butter bath. Most of the beef is Linz Heritage Black Angus.

Swift & Sons

Boka Restaurant Group’s exquisite meat palace wows diners with compelling versions of Caesar salad, steak tartare, and other steakhouse staples. For dessert, a chocolate trolley filled with cakes, cookies, candies, and more is wheeled around the dining room. There’s a sibling location across from Wrigley Field with a scaled-back menu.

A platter of sliced steak.
Steaks like this and beef Wellington are Swift & Sons’ signature items.
Swift & Sons [Official Photo]

BLVD Steakhouse

BLVD pivoted during the pandemic and now hands its reins to chef Joe Flamm who moves over from Rose Mary to give this West Loop space some pop. The steaks are from several local farms and can be boosted with toppings like chimichurri, blue cheese, or béarnaise. The space remains luxe and feels very vintage Hollywood. 

Bazaar Meat by José Andrés

José Andrés and Gibsons partnered on this beefy spot by the river above Bar Mar. It offers suckling pig, sweetbreads, and blood sausage, but the standouts are the steaks: wagyu, angus, “vaca viejo” (from older working cattle, said to have a more pronounced flavor), chateaubriand, bone-in, skirt steak, and much, much more.

A long green print-upholstered banquette encircles a table beneath a geometric chandelier in the foreground; in the background, more tables and floor-to-ceiling windows.
The dining room at Bazaar Meat by José Andrés.
Garrett Sweet/Eater Chicago

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El Che Steakhouse & Bar

Chef John Manion pays tribute to asado, a traditional South American barbecue, at his West Loop restaurant. The dining room is set up to give diners a first-hand look at Argentinian-style cuts cooking over open flames on a custom-built hearth. Order the parrillada platter for a variety of different meats, including grilled beef short ribs, sweetbreads, bone marrow, morcilla, chorizo, bife angosto, and more.

Bonyeon

In America, “omakase” is mostly reserved for sushi chefs. But perception is changing, and the owners of Omakase Yume, a fantastic sushi restaurant in its own right, are showing off different elements of Japanese and Korean cooking. Chef Sangtae Park has unveiled Bonyeon, a 12-seat counter with seven courses dedicated to showcasing beef in its purest forms. Well-known cuts will accompany less-appreciated ones, as Park gives diners a dining experience seldom seen in Chicago.

A chef presents a small plate of cooked beef. Jeff Marini/Bonyeon

Kindling | Downtown Cookout & Cocktails

Perhaps it’s not giving Kindling, the ground-floor restaurant inside the Willis Tower, not enough credit by calling it a steakhouse. Chef Jonathon Sawyer won a James Beard Award for his work in Cleveland, and he’s made a mark by teaming up with Fifty/50 Restaurant Group with a decadent menu of fire-grilled items. Inspired by famed chef Francis Mallmann, the team takes pride in live-fire cooking, and the result is some of the tastiest beef in Chicago with a hint of South American influence. Seriously, everything — even the wagyu Italian beef — is kissed with a little smoke. And that leads to deliciousness. 

Chris Peters/Eater Chicago

Chicago Firehouse Restaurant

Located inside a building that was once a Chicago Fire Department firehouse, this South Loop establishment is steeped in history. In 2017, ownership rebuilt and restored the space after a devastating fire forced it to close. The menu boasts highlights like lobster bisque, prime steaks, and Irish coffee cheesecake.

Holu

The item at the very top of the menu at Holu is “Meat Paradise,” and the steakhouse in the 88 Marketplace in Pilsen delivers: there are USDA Prime cuts, Australian and American wagyu, and Japanese Kobe, plus non-beefy seasonal specials like Iberico ham, live eel, and lobster. Order by the ounce to try out every cut, and then cook the meat to your desired temperature on a tabletop grill.

Related Maps