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A Critic Compares Passerotto’s Korean Kitchen to Fat Rice and Parachute

Plus Lost Larson has filled a pastry void in Andersonville

A wooden board holds a round white plate that contains sliced kalbi and eight smaller dishes that hold various colorful banchan.
Passerotto
Barry Brecheisen

Passerotto is “loaded with charm” in Andersonville and the small plates are “consistently interesting, approachable with a touch of the unexpected,” writes Phil Vettel. Chef-owner Jennifer Kim is cooking “intensely personal” Korean fare with a “smidgen of Italian inspiration,” such as lamb ragu over pan-seared rice cakes. Raw hamachi gets “subtle support from a complex, pickled-lime kosho and tart gooseberries,” and dry-aged lamb tartare packs a punch as an “umami bomb.” Family-style platters range from traditional kalbi short ribs to mixed-seafood soondubu — a Korean stew — and are accompanied by a variety of seasonal banchan. Dessert yields “simple but enjoyable” cantuccini while the beverage program is also a “revelation,” stocked with “interesting” cocktails and about a dozen “food-friendly wines.” [Tribune]

Lost Larson is filling the pastry void in Andersonville left behind by Swedish Bakery and Pasticceria Natalina. The duchess cake, a tribute to Swedish Bakery’s signature prinsesstarta, is a “silk-soft cloud of gentle, creamy sweetness” and fruit tarts are bound by a “sweet, buttery” crust that sends a “jolt to the pleasure center of the brain as soon as they hit the tongue.” Sourdough loaves possess an “exceptional tang” thanks to a long fermentation process while savory pastries like a cheddar-kale scone have Mike Sula excited to see what chef Bobby Shaffer has planned down the road. The products aren’t cheap but Lost Larson is a “cheerful spot to seek refuge, minimally designed but bright and full of good feelings, proof that Andersonville really can have uncompromising pastry in a welcoming space.” [Reader]

Lisa Shames says Tied House is the “type of risk-taking restaurant you’d expect to find in the West Loop or River North, but not in Lakeview.” Chef Debbie Gold’s dishes are “beautifully balanced and nudge diners just a bit out of their culinary comfort zones.” Purple sweet potato is a memorable starter, baked in salt and then deep-fried to order. Mackerel is aged in beeswax for 12 days, which “softens its hard edges and adds a deepness that wasn’t there before” while short rib yields a “tender chunk of meat that’s been slowly braised with lemongrass, ginger and coriander.” Dessert includes a deconstructed version of wedding cake made with angel food cake, freeze-dried raspberry, and rose petal. [Sophisticated Living]

Flight Club is a fun spot for a midday meal and a game of darts. Joanne Trestrail thinks the lunch menu hits the mark with options like “superb” tandoori chicken skewers and “good but quiet” mini poke tacos. Lobster and shrimp chowder is “creamy, flavorful and not overthickened” while the Reuben is light, “its Swiss cheese judiciously applied and its spicy pickles providing satisfying crunch alongside the kraut.” Duds include a “ho-hum” Caesar and “dry” beef fillet chops but overall, Flight Club is full of charm and appealing bites. [Crain’s]

Passerotto

5420 North Clark Street, , IL 60640 (708) 607-2102 Visit Website

Tied House

3157 North Southport Avenue, , IL 60657 (773) 525-2508 Visit Website

Flight Club

111 W. Wacker Drive, , IL 60601 (312) 284-2474 Visit Website

Lost Larson

2140 West Division Street, , IL 60622 (773) 770-9015 Visit Website

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