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New Alcohol Delivery Service Makes Getting Sauced in Chicago Even Easier

Saucey entered the Chicago market this week.

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Courtesy of Saucey

Another startup promising boozers speedy delivery of alcoholic drinks to their homes, a park or office has entered the Chicago market. For those who don't mind paying a bit more, Saucey is here to quench the public's thirst, offering alcoholic drinks to an initial delivery area consisting of The Loop to Wrigleyville, west to Wicker Park, West Town and the West Loop. The Los Angeles-based company launched in 2014 and already serves L.A., San Francisco and San Diego, where they'll also gladly show up with cocktail mixers, cigarettes and even ice cream.

Users download an Android or iOS app and place their orders on their phones or on their web browser. Crain's noted that other companies, including DrinkFlyDrizlyCocktail Courier and Foxtrot already offer similar services in Chicago. But Saucey brass touts that their company has its own drivers instead of relying on second-party courier services. That supposedly allows for better customer service and faster deliveries; Saucey's promising beer, wine and liquor will arrive in less than an hour. There's also a larger selection of products, according to Saucey, as they'll also deliver snacks, cigarette rolling papers and cocktail packages. Want to stay at home and watch the "Big Lebowski" while drinking a White Russian but the pantry's dry? They'll deliver the vodka and Kahlua, but they don't offer half and half or milk. Guess the drink will have to use Bailey's Irish Cream.

There's no minimum purchase for delivery, and the higher item costs do include driver fee, tax and tip. It's $13.75 for a 12-pack of PBR, $30.75 for a 750-ml bottle of Jack Daniels whiskey. Wine ranges from $13.50 for a bottle of Barefoot Chardonnay to a $228.75 bottle of Dom Pérignon. Patrons will just need their ID to prove they're at least 21. Mr. McFeely never dreamed up such a service.

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